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Eco Friendly Swaps for Everyday Life

 

 

The ways to cut back on plastic can seem shrouded in secrecy, what with quick single use fixes readily available everywhere we look!  Phasing out plastic from your day-to-day life is easier that you think, and to make it even easier here is a list of 20 swappable items to get the ball rolling!


Plastic Wrap

When the food it’s wrapped in is eaten, plastic wrap stays for years to come.  Try a beeswax alternative to keep food covered and fresh.


Floss

Coated with PFC and encased in plastic, your standard floss can be swapped for a Waterpik or an eco-friendly floss like Eco-Dent!


Produce Bags

They’re convenient, but their usage is short-lived.  Make a habit to bring a mesh produce bag on your shopping trips and eliminate this overused single us plastic!


Shopping Bags

Along similar lines of produce bags, plastic shopping bags aren’t just found at grocery stores, but do end up in landfills after your 15 minute drive home.  Use a canvas tote or backpack over and over to.


Water Bottles

With options like Klean Kanteen and other reusable water bottles, there’s no reason to indulge in that Fiji water.

 

Deodorant

Replace your plastic tubed antiperspirant with the 99% plastic free packaging deodorant from Chagrin Valley!


Hand Soap

Using bottle after bottle of soap to keep your hands clean sure does make the earth dirty.  Switch to a minimally packaged alternative like a bar of soap, and support small businesses by trying one of the many great soap makers on Etsy!


Takeout

There’s nothing embarrassing about cutting down on waste.  Next time you hit your favorite lunch spot, pack a reusable storage container like the Earth Hero lunchbox and keep your leftovers away from the styrofoam!


Tupperware

Many Tupperware users have good intentions, but when the containers get dingy, the plastic goes in the trash.  Alternatives like mason jars and glass pyrex containers can eliminate the use of short-lived plastics!



Coffee Cups

A double whammy, with a plastic lid and a cup that’s plastic lined, coffee cups are deceptively bad for the environment and with a world obsessed with hot bean water, the cups keep piling up.  Get a thermos and kick the wasteful paper and plastic cups to the curb.


Dishwasher/Laundry Detergent

Jugs and tubs of laundry detergent are a huge part of plastic pollution.  Keep your clothes, dishes and the world clean by switching to Dropps!


Diapers

You’ve brought a bundle of joy into this world, now keep the world healthy for them to grow up in. 20 billion diapers end up in landfills each year, so switching from plastic to reusable cloth diapers can make all the difference.


Dryer Sheets

Ditch these single use nightmares with a wool dryer ball.  Missing the scent that comes with your dryer sheets? Put a drop of essential oil on the wool ball and let it work its magic!


Menstrual Products

Feminine hygiene products are not only toxic to the body in many cases, they make up a huge portion of waste!  Products like the Diva Cup will keep glyphosphate sprayed cotton away from your body and out of the landfill.


Razor

Disposable razors can be swapped for a safety razor.  Once you get the hang of it, you’ll never turn back!


Straws

Grabbing much of the attention in the plastic use discussion, the alternatives to straws come in glass and metal options, and can be found everywhere, so there’s no excuse to keep using plastic straws!


Toilet Paper

Cut down your paper usage, not trees.  Try tree-free and budget friendly toilet paper from companies like Who Gives a Crap instead.


Paper Towels

Paper towels are another product contributing to deforestation!  A reusable rag is more absorbent and can cut back the 13 billion lbs we waste annually, according to the EPA!


K Cups/ Coffee Pods

It seems obvious, but the coffee pod craze that caught the nation by storm also has a reusable cup option that will make the same cup of coffee, without the trash.  


Aluminum Foil

Foil is not only harmful in its production, it takes approximately 400 years to decompose!  Swap it out for a Silpat mat, or reusable baking mat!

 

[Photo: iStock, WWF]




1 comment

  • Thank you for this article!!!! Awesome info!

    Crissy

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